Music

Among a few of the other many deaths of 2018; a dozen or so lives who touched us one way or another during their time among us. Robin Leach Bouncy, slightly doughy, and often cartoon-like Brit who came along at the right place at exactly the right time; a guy who both exploited and made […]

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Footprints Large and Small: Musical Deaths in 2018

by M.C. Antil on December 28, 2018

Besides Aretha Franklin, a giant for the ages and a singer for all time, the music world also lost a number of lesser lights this year who, nevertheless, left their mark on our collective soul.  Among them: Danny Kirwan He may have spent much of his life a homeless and helpless substance abuser, but prior to […]

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R.I.P.: Joe Osborn

by M.C. Antil on December 22, 2018

He and his buddy, a brilliant young picker named James, were two Louisiana teenagers from Shreveport who’d made a few records with their boyhood pal Dale Hawkins before heading west to seek whatever fame and fortune they could muster. I’ll spare you all the machinations, but the important thing to know is that at a […]

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Walter Becker: An Appreciation

by M.C. Antil on September 20, 2017

Author’s note: This is a rather long-winded tribute to a recently-fallen idol. So consider this brief caveat, if you will, my geek alert. If you’re a Steely Dan nut, as I; indeed, read on. You may actually enjoy the ride. But if you’ve never been baptised in the cool, healing waters of Walter Becker and […]

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A Don Williams Sampler

by M.C. Antil on September 9, 2017

In the 1970’s, the traditional rhinestone country music the world had come to know and love for decades – a honky tonk/my-girl-left-me-and-stole-my-truck brand of popular music that relied as much on raw emotions and cheatin’ hearts as it did on rhyme, rhythm and twang – had become all but passé. What began replacing it was […]

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Uncle Phil and My Greatest Gift Ever

by M.C. Antil on January 7, 2017

The Syracuse of my youth had something for everyone, especially when it came to music. For whatever reason, even though the city was only about the fourth or fifth largest in the state, it produced a disproportionate number of musicians, many of whom would become working professionals, and a few of whom would go on […]

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A Bad Year for Rock and Roll

by M.C. Antil on January 2, 2017

A few years ago, I posted a piece on a Chuck Prophet tune called Summertime Thing that I’d heard one Memorial Day and fallen in love with. And like so many of my silly little essays, I just posted it on my site not knowing what impact, if any, it might have had on anyone who […]

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One of the most poetic things about Auld Lang Syne is its delicate blend of hope and melancholy. For all the song’s hope for the year ahead, is a very real sense of mourning for the one about to fade to memory. And, not to go all numbers geek here, but I’d say the song is something like 60% […]

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Song of the Season: If We Make it Through December

by M.C. Antil on December 25, 2016

By Christmas 1979, America was not just staggering, it was reeling. The Iran hostage crisis. The skyrocketing price of oil, the rationing, the crushing demand, and the endless lines at the gas pump. And, perhaps worst of all, the offshoring of hundreds of thousands of American jobs and the closing of countless American factories. Former California […]

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Song of the Season: Peace Piece

by M.C. Antil on December 24, 2016

Eventually pianist Bill Evans would become a jazz legend. In time, he would emerge as one of the pioneers of cerebral, contemplative form of the genre called modal jazz, one based less on chord progressions than a handful of atmospheric tones. And just a year later he would serve as the backbone of the most influential jazz […]

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